Category: Snakes

Milk Snake Species Profile: Housing, Diet, and Life Span

Lampropeltis (pyomelana, triangulum, and zonata) Quick Stats : Milk Snake Family: Colubridae Origin: From Canada south to Venezuela, but mostly found in the United States Size: 2 to 4 feet as adults Diet: In the wild; small rodents, birds, lizards, and other snakes. In captivity; vitamin-dusted mice Water: A bowl of fresh clean water should be available at all times, preferably large enough to allow the snake to soak; provide fresh water daily Housing: Commercial snake enclosure or a 20 gallon, long aquarium with a locking screen top for a medium sized snake; a larger snake will need up to a 60 gallon aquarium.
Snake Anatomy Quiz
Snake Anatomy Quiz
Snake charmers seem to understand and have a good rapport with snakes and can seemingly hypnotize them through music and movement. While it may be hard for us to conceive of the notion of entertaining this reptilian creature much the same way in our homes, a snake can make a fascinating pet. How much do you know and understand about snakes and their anatomy?
Snake Shedding: Ecdysis and Dysecdysis
Snake Shedding: Ecdysis and Dysecdysis
Shed skin from a snake Shedded snake skin All reptiles shed their skins, referred to as ecdysis, in a manner that differs from species to species. Snakes shed or "slough" their skins in one piece, including eye caps, as opposed to lizards who look like they are recovering from a bad case of sunburn during a shed.
Snakes
Snakes
Snakes have been on the earth for 70 million years, some reaching 50-100 feet in length. Learn more about these fascinating creatures, and their feeding, basic care, and common health problems. Ball Python Cleaning Reptile Cages Egg Binding (Dystocia) Eye Anatomy Germs: Bacteria, Viruses and Fungi Gout Green Tree Python and Emerald Tree Boa Management Heart Anatomy Housing & Environment Humidity: Monitoring and Control Inclusion Body Disease Milk Snake Mites and Ticks Mosquito Control Mouth Anatomy and Physiology Mouth Rot (Infectious Stomatitis) Mycobacterium Infections Neurons Oral Care Overfeeding and Obesity Pentastomes: Respiratory Parasites of Reptiles Purchase Considerations Safety Concerns for Your Herp Salmonellosis and Its Risk to Reptile Owners Shedding of Skin (Ecdysis) Snake Anatomy and Physiology Wellness Exams Zoonoses Check out the most popular related products.
Snakes' Simple Secrets
Snakes' Simple Secrets
Snakes seem so different than other animal species, but are they? Take this quiz to test your knowledge about the anatomy and physiology of snakes. A snake has a three-chambered heart (mammals have four-chambered hearts). Snakes have a liver, pancreas, and two kidneys, just like mammals. Boas have vestigial legs.
Snake Anatomy and Physiology
Snake Anatomy and Physiology
Sense organs The sense organs of snakes are uniquely different than those of mammals and other animals. Unlike mammals, which mainly rely on their sight and hearing, snakes rely primarily on their senses of smell and touch. They do not have moveable eyelids, but transparent caps called "brille" as protective eye coverings.
Finding the Perfect Snake for You
Finding the Perfect Snake for You
Are you thinking about getting a pet snake, but aren't sure which snake species is right for you? In my time working in the pet industry, I've had the opportunity to care for several different species of snakes, and I've learned some of defining characteristics across one. Here, I'll break down some of the differences between the most commonly available pet snakes to help guide your decision.
Snake Shedding
Snake Shedding
Large.png large.png Why do snakes shed? All reptiles-including snakes-shed their skin as part of a natural process called "ecdysis." Unlike other animals, reptile skin doesn't grow as a snake grows, so unless a snake sheds his skin, he can't grow any larger. Once a snake grows to a point that his scales begin to look stretched, a new layer of skin will develop under the current one.
Milk Snake Species Profile: Housing, Diet, and Life Span
Milk Snake Species Profile: Housing, Diet, and Life Span
Lampropeltis (pyomelana, triangulum, and zonata) Quick Stats : Milk Snake Family: Colubridae Origin: From Canada south to Venezuela, but mostly found in the United States Size: 2 to 4 feet as adults Diet: In the wild; small rodents, birds, lizards, and other snakes. In captivity; vitamin-dusted mice Water: A bowl of fresh clean water should be available at all times, preferably large enough to allow the snake to soak; provide fresh water daily Housing: Commercial snake enclosure or a 20 gallon, long aquarium with a locking screen top for a medium sized snake; a larger snake will need up to a 60 gallon aquarium.
Salmonellosis: Reptile Owners at Risk from Turtles, Lizards and Snakes
Salmonellosis: Reptile Owners at Risk from Turtles, Lizards and Snakes
92% Of all snakes carry Salmonella If you ask the average lay person if there are any risks in owning a pet turtle or other reptile, the one that is most commonly mentioned is Salmonella bacteria. Most, if not all, reptiles carry Salmonella in their intestinal tract and intermittently or continuously shed these bacteria in their feces.
Questions to Ask Before Buying a Snake, Lizard, Amphibian, or Turtle
Questions to Ask Before Buying a Snake, Lizard, Amphibian, or Turtle
Considerations before buying a herp As you consider buying a snake, lizard, amphibian, or other herp (reptiles and amphibians), there are a number of things you have to know. And you must consider these well in advance of going out to the pet store and falling in love with an animal that may prove to be ultimately unsuitable.
Help! My Snake is Shedding
Help! My Snake is Shedding
It is normal for all snakes to shed their skin-referred to as ecdysis -in a regular cycle. Ecdysis is a natural process that results from the growth of the snake and is therefore dependent on a variety of factors including, species, age, nutrition, and environment. Typically, a healthy adult snake will shed approximately once every month.
Housing Your Snake: Cages, Lighting, Heating and Humidity
Housing Your Snake: Cages, Lighting, Heating and Humidity
Housing and Environment Snake Housing Educating yourself about how to care for your first snake is quite an experience, and a necessary one if you are going to provide for the health and care of your snake. Before you bring a snake into your home, you should consider how large it will grow, and what its habitat requires in terms of size of cage, lighting, temperature, and humidity.